Artificial insemination in species of parrots

The critical situation of many species of parrots has captive breeding as the only alternative, where reproductive failures are relatively common. This requires human intervention for artificial insemination. One of the greatest difficulties encountered by experts in this process is the availability of semen at the right time, that is, during egg laying, so achieving its conservation by cryopreservation is an alternative to be taken into account. , as already happens in the case of mammals.

Objectives

Once the previous phase of this project has concluded, in which the collection of semen was successfully achieved in more than 100 species of large psittacines and the subsequent artificial insemination, the objective is focused on establishing a method for the conservation of semen by freezing.

Strategies

Researchers from the Loro Parque Fundación and the University of Giessen are working on defining a specific protocol for application to artificial insemination in parrots. To do this, they dedicate special effort to investigate the penetration of sperm into the previtelline membrane of the egg and determine if the count of pores left by the sperm in it serves to differentiate fertilized eggs from those that are not during different periods of time. after laying and incubation.

Actions

The study has been carried out comparatively for different species of anseriformes, galliformes and falconiformes birds. The eggs were cared for in an incubator for a maximum of seven days, recording the influence of time, temperature and light exposure. With the exception of geese, the system has been a success and although the results indicate that it is effective in a wide variety of species, the process needs to be further refined with further research.

Germany
Giessen

Local Partner
University of Giessen

Funds since 2010: The study has been carried out comparatively for different species of anseriformes, galliformes and falconiformes birds. The eggs were cared for in an incubator for a maximum of seven days, recording the influence of time, temperature and light exposure. With the exception of geese, the system has been a success and although the results indicate that it is effective in a wide variety of species, the process needs to be further refined with further research.

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